Sunday, January 15, 2006

Electricity and Gas Face Off : Arbitrage at Hubs

EN ESPAÑOL MÁS ABAJO

Before the liberalisation of the power sector, demand for gas in power generation was mainly a matter of price optimisation of different input fuels on a long term basis. Utilities had a portfolio of power plants which each had its place in the “merit order” for dispatching power. This ranking was a function of operating costs, efficiencies and fuel prices. In the order of merit, nuclear, hydro and lignite were generally used as base-load energy sources and coal was generally used for base- or middle-load. Depending on relative pricing, gas was used for middle- and peak-load. The high efficiency and low capital costs of gas-fired CCGT plants mean that they can also compete for base-load if gas prices allow. With the increased use of gas for power generation and the opening of the electricity grid to competition, demand for gas for power generation becomes more price elastic in the short-term as the competitive electricity market offers short-term incentives to take gas or not, according to its price. Power producers can resell gas they have purchased under long-term contracts (if contracts permit). They can sell the gas at the current market price and buy electricity from the grid, if that gives a higher yield than using the gas to produce power.

In a competitive gas and electricity market, the operator of a gas-fired power plant can optimise his operations according to what is known as the “spark spread”. The spark spread is defined as the difference, at a particular location and at a particular point in time, between the fuel cost of generating a MWh of electricity and the price of electricity. It is calculated as the difference between the product of the gas price and the heat rate (1) of a power plant (a measure of thermal efficiency) used to generate the electricity less the spot price of electricity at that location. As a result, a positive spark spread indicates the power generator should buy electricity rather than make it.

Arbitrage (2) between the electricity and gas markets functions this way: when the market price of electricity is higher than the price of gas at the power plant, plus variable power production costs and taking into account the thermal efficiency, the power generator will generate electricity from gas. In the opposite case, he will produce from another energy source or buy the electricity on the spot market (3). He may interrupt his own production and sell gas instead of burning it. The market price of spot gas is, therefore, increasingly determined by the spot price of electricity.

In the United States, suppliers of natural gas to electricity generators increasingly track the price of power at different locations in real time. When the price of electricity rises at one location, they try to sell more gas into a market nearby, or they transport gas to a particular generator and make an arrangement with the generator to produce more power. In this case, the gas supplier may arrange to sell the power himself – a practice known as “tolling”. It occurred in the United Kingdom during the second dash for gas, after 1995, when producers saw that they could earn more from their gas by converting it into electricity than by selling it on the spot market. They arranged with independent power producers to “toll” their gas and take the electricity receipts in exchange for a tolling charge.

In the United States, the complexity of the deregulated gas market and its growing interrelationship with electricity markets have increased the need for coordination among market participants. In addition to dealing with production problems, timely additions of natural gas pipeline capacity and other infrastructure will require co-ordination among pipeline companies, consumers, the FERC and state regulatory bodies. Given the existence of high generation over-capacity and growing competition in liberalising power markets, the situation in Continental Europe is converging with that of the United Kingdom. In 2001, Belgian gas prices were less competitive than usual, and electricity utilities in Belgium reduced their gas off-takes by 5.8% to the benefit of coal and oil.

Since most of the growth potential for natural gas lies in power generation, gas prices to generators will need to be competitive with the electricity price if this demand potential is to be realised. Europe’s overcapacity in power generation and the resulting depressed price of electricity in some European countries means that for some time it will not be economic to build new gas-fired capacity.
-----------------------------------------------
(1) Klein, Joel B. The Use of Heat Rates in Production Cost Modeling and Market Modeling. April 17, 1998. Electricity Analysis Office. California Energy Commission.

(2) Arbitrage covers three main situations:

  • Time arbitrage is trading the difference of gas prices at different times via spot and futures prices.
  • Geographical arbitrage is trading the difference in the price of gas on different markets. Examples of geographical arbitrage include trading the price difference between natural gas in the United Kingdom and Belgium (Zeebrugge) or transatlantic arbitrage of LNG between LNG exported to Europe or to the United States. This calculation will include the cost of transportation of LNG to the United States.
  • Form arbitrage is exploiting the difference in the value of gas in different markets, electricity and spot gas markets. Gaselectricity arbitrage is the most common example of form arbitrage.

(3) In this case, he also needs to take into account the cost of not using his gas plant.
--------------------------------------
Text above is an excerpt from "Natural Gas Market Liberalisation: A New Context for Flexibility." By Sylvie Cornot-Gandolphe, Gas Expert. IEA. Energy Diversification Division, Office of Long Term Policy Co-operation and Analysis. 2002.
-------------------------------------
Some Interesting Links

Modeling of Cost-Rate Curves. James D. McCally. Dept. of Electrical and Computer Eng. U. of Iowa.

Some Fundamemtals of Electricity Derivatives. By Alexander Eydeland Southern Company Energy Marketing And Helyette Geman University Paris IX Dauphine and ESSEC July 1998.

Financial Methods in Competitive Electricity Markets. By Shijie Deng. Doctoral dissertation in the U. Of Californa. Berkeley, 1999

Electricity Trading In Competitive Power Market: An Overview And Key Issues. Prabodh Bajpai and S. N. Singh. ICPS2004, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Another post of this blog related with this issue:
Real Options: A Complementary Tool to Make Better Operational and Capital Investment Decisions in Power Systems
-------------------------------------

GoTo Comprehensive List of Posts in this Blog (Ir a Lista Completa de Todos los Comentarios del Blog)
GoTo Last Comment in Main Page (Ir al Último Comentario en la Página Principal del Blog)


CONFRONTACIÓN ELECTRICIDAD GAS: ARBITRAJE EN HUBS


Antes de la liberalización del Sector Eléctrico, la demanda de gas para generar electricidad formaba parte principalmente del tema de la optimización a largo plazo del precio de los diversos combustibles empleados para producir electricidad. Las empresas eléctricas disponían de un parque de centrales que se despachaban de acuerdo con la "orden de mérito" que establecía el algoritmo del programa de despacho económico que corría en los ordenadores del centro de control de la red. Esta clasificación de las central según el "orden de merito" era función de los costes operativos de cada central y de los precios del combustible que la central utilizaba para generar electricidad. En la "orden de mérito" las centrales nucleares, hidráulicas y de lignito se despachaban para atender la carga base, y las de carbón para atender la carga del llano o la punta. Dependiendo de los precios relativos, las centrales de gas se utilizaban para atender la carga del llano o la punta. Por su alto rendimiento y reducidos costes de capital las centrales con turbinas de gas de ciclo combinado pueden competir con los otros tipos de centrales para atender también la carga base si los precios del gas lo permiten. Con el aumento de la utilización del gas para generar electricidad y la apertura del acceso a la red para terceros, la demanda del gas para generar electricidad se vuelve a corto plazo más elástica al precio cuando el mercado competitivo de electricidad ofrece incentivos a corto plazo para comprar gas o no, de acuerdo con el precio que tenga. Los generadores de electricidad pueden revender el gas que tengan comprado con contratos a largo plazo (si el contrato lo permite), a precios de mercado y comprar electricidad si ello les proporciona mayor beneficio que comprar gas para producir electricidad.

En un mercado competitivo de gas y electrcidad, el operador de una central de gas puede optimizar sus operaciones de acuerdo con lo que se conoce como "spark spread”, que se define como la diferencia, en una determinada localización y en un determinado instante, entre los costes del combustible para generar un kWh de electricidad y el precio de la electricidad. Se calcula como la diferencia entre el producto del precio del gas y el consumo térmico unitario (heat rate (1)) de la central empleada para generar la electricidad menos el precio spot de la electricidad en ese punto. Como resultado, una "spark spread" positiva indica que el generador debe comprar electricidad en lugar de producirla.

El arbitraje (2) entre la electricidad y el gas funciona de la siguiente manera: cuando el precio de mercado de la electricidad es mayor que el precio del gas en la central eléctrica, más los costes variables de producción de electricidad y teniendo en cuenta la eficiencia térmica, el generador producirá electricidad a partir del gas. En el caso contrario, lo hará con otro combustible o comprará la electricidad en el mercado spot (3). El generador puede interrumpir su propia producción y vender gas en lugar de quemarlo. Por consiguiente, el precio de mercado de gas spot está cada vez más determinado por el precio spot de la electricidad.

En los Estados Unidos, los suministradores de gas natural que suministran a los generadores de electricidad cada vez más vigilan en tiempo real los precios que tiene la electricidad en distintas localizaciones. Cuando el precio de la electricidad sube en un lugar, intentan vender más gas en el mercado más cercano, o transportar gas hasta un generador concreto y llegar a un acuerdo con él para producir más electricidad. En este caso, el suministrador de gas puede acordar vender la electricidad por sí mismo -práctica conocida como "tolling". Esto ocurrió en el Reino Unido durante la segunda carrera por el gas, después de 1995, cuando los productores de gas vieron que podían ganar más con su gas convirtiéndolo en electricidad que vendiéndolo en el mercado spot. Los productores de gas establecieron acuerdos de "tolling" (contratos de peaje que trasladan el riesgo de adquisición del gas y su posterior venta de electricidad) con los productores independientes de electricidad, aceptando la facturación de electricidad de estos para cobrar el "tolling".

En los Estados Unidos, la complejidad del mercado desregulado del gas y su cada vez mayor interrelación con los mercados de electricidad ha aumentado la necesidad de coordinación entre los participantes en el mercado. Además, de manejar los problemas de producción, el cumplimiento de la puesta en servicio programada de nuevos gasoductos y otras infraestructuras exigirá la corrdinación entre las compañías de transporte de gas, consumidores, FERC y los cuerpos regulatorios de los estados. Dada la situación de la existencia de alta sobrecapacidad de generación y creciente competencia en los mercados liberalizados de electricicidad, la situación en la Europa Continental converge hacia la del Reino Unido. En 2001, los precios del gas belga fueron menos competitivos de lo normal, y las empresas eléctricas belgas redujeron la utilización del gas un 5,8% en beneficio del carbón y el fuel.

Puesto que la mayor parte del crecimiento potencial del gas natural gira en torno a la generación de electricidad, los precios del gas para los generadores tenfrán que ser competitivos con el precio de la electricidad si esta demanda potencial se realiza. La sobrecapacidad europea de generación de electricidad y la consiguiente reducción del precio de la electricidad en algunos países europeos significa que por algún tiempo no será económico construir nueva capacidad en centrales de gas.

------------------------
(1) El coste unitario del combustible repercute directamente en el coste unitario del kWh, que depende del consumo térmico o Heat Rate (HR) por kWh. El consumo térmico no es sino la cantidad de energía calorífica, expresada en kJ (kilo julios), requerida para generar un kWh (kilowatio hora) de energía eléctrica. El HR es inversamente proporcional a la eficiencia, cuanto menor sea, mayor es el rendimiento de la turbina. El consumo térmico unitario se calcula multiplicando el consumo total de combustible (en kilos/hora o metros cúbicos/hora) por el poder calorífico inferior del combustible (PCI) en cuestión (en kJ(kg o kJ/m3) de ese combustible, y este producto se divide por la capacidad neta en kW. La curva de consumo térmico de un grupo generador describe la relación entre la energía que aporta el combustible que quema (input) en función de la electricidad que produce (output). Típicamente la fórmula empleada para facilitar la parametrización de esta curva ha sido una expresión cuadrática de la forma:
Q = a + b ∙ P + c ∙ P2,
donde
Q es el consumo de combustible [GJ/hr], y
P es la potencia del grupo [MW].

Véase Klein, Joel B. The Use of Heat Rates in Production Cost Modeling and Market Modeling. April 17, 1998. Electricity Analysis Office. California Energy Commission.

(2) El arbitraje comprende tres casos principales:

  • El arbitraje temporal consiste en negociar la diferencia de los precios del gas en diferentes momentos mediante precios spot y de futuros.
  • El arbitraje geográfico consiste en negociar la diferencia del precio del gas en diferentes mercados. Por ejemplo, negociar la diferencia de precio entre el gas del Reino Unido y el gas belga (Zeebrugge), o el arbitraje transatlántico de gas natural licuado (LNG) entre LNG exportado a Europa o a los Estados Unidos. Este cálculo incluirá los costes de transporte del LNG a los Estados Unidos.
  • El arbitraje de forma, o "cross-commodity", consiste en explotar la diferencia de valor del gas en diferente mercados, los mercados spot de electricidad y gas. El arbitraje electricidad-gas es el ejemplo más común de este tipo de arbitraje.

(3) En este caso, también hay que tener en cuenta el coste de no utilizar la central de gas.

------------------------------------------
El texto anterior es un extracto de "Natural Gas Market Liberalisation: A New Context for Flexibility." By Sylvie Cornot-Gandolphe, Experta en Gas. International Energy Agency. Energy Diversification Division, Office of Long Term Policy Co-operation and Analysis. 2002.
-----------------------------------------
Link de interés:
"Trading de Energía y Gestión de Portfolios" Angel Caballero del Avellanal. MADRID, Enero 2003. Universidad Pontificia Comillas. Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingenieria (ICAI). Instituto de Postgrado y Formación Continua.

Modeling of Cost-Rate Curves. James D. McCally. Dept. of Electrical and Computer Eng. U. of Iowa.

Some Fundamemtals of Electricity Derivatives. By Alexander Eydeland Southern Company Energy Marketing And Helyette Geman University Paris IX Dauphine and ESSEC July 1998.

Financial Methods in Competitive Electricity Markets. By Shijie Deng. Doctoral dissertation in the U. Of Californa. Berkeley, 1999

Electricity Trading In Competitive Power Market: An Overview And Key Issues. Prabodh Bajpai and S. N. Singh. ICPS2004, Kathmandu, Nepal.

Comentario de interés en este mismo blog:
Real Options: A Complementary Tool to Make Better Operational and Capital Investment Decisions in Power Systems



GoTo Comprehensive List of Posts in this Blog (Ir a Lista Completa de Todos los Comentarios del Blog)
GoTo Last Comment in Main Page (Ir al Último Comentario en la Página Principal del Blog)

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home