Friday, August 17, 2007

Two Books About The Electricity Industry

en español más abajo


Electrical Storm
By William Tucker
The Wall Street Journal - EUROPE
Tuesday, July 24, 2007


With surnmer heat blazing over much of the U.S. and millions of air conditioners set on high, the country is having its annual flirtation with a massive brownout or blackout. Even without a dramatic accident, however, electricity is at the center of every discussion about a carbon tax, renewable energy or the energy producers' interest in building nuclear reactors. There is much at stake.


The Grid



As Phillip Schewe writes in "The Grid," the U.S.'s electric infrastructure is "the most complex machine ever made." Tying together hydroelectric dams and 1,000-megawatt coal plants, wendingits way across thousands of miles of transmission lines, carrying electricity at hundreds of thousands of volts through substations that step it up and down until it is finally brought across the last mile into American homes at a tame 120 volts-the electrical grid is an astonishing balancing act that must match supply and demand minute by minute, hour by hour, year by year. As Jason Makansi, the author of "Lights Out," puts it: "Very few peopIe on this planet truly appreciate how difficult it is to control the flow of electricity."


Ligths Out


Of course, it doesn't always work. When a couple of trees brush against a transmission wire in Ohio, for instance, most of the East Coast may go dark-as it did in the surnmer of 2003. Experts agree that the long-distance transmission system has been stretched to the breaking point. Mr. Makansi asks: "How did a First World country end up with a Third World grid?" Mr. Schewe, who has a doctorate in particle physics and serves as chief science writer at the American Institute of Physics, seems like the ideal man to tackle the subject. He gives us a lively history of the grid. Mr. Schewe recounts Nikola Tesla's invention of altemating current (AC), which allowed electrical transmission to travel more efficiently and over longer distances than the direct current (DC); power favored by Thomas Edison. (Tesla and Edison became bitter opponents over the issue.)

'The Grid" is enlightening, but somewhere along the line Mr. Schewe became enthralled with the literature doubting progress. Henry David Thoreau, Henry Adams and Lewis Mumford are his mentors. Each is cited bemoaning the corrupting effects of speed and technology and lamenting the loss of simpler relations between man and nature. Thus for every step forward in turbine technology, Mr. Schewe asks: "Is it all worth it?" As he surnmarizes: "The grid...lights our homes, preserves food, brings us cheap aluminum. It also brings us pollution, overhead wires, clockwork tedium, and a massive contribution toward greenhouse warming and climate change." In the end, Mr. Schewe never really resolves the matter. Mr. Makansi, an industry consultant and founder of the newsletter Common Sense on Energy and Our Environment, is a chemical engineer by training. At one point he admits to never really understanding the difference between direct and altemating current. But he knows the industry backward and forward. Try this. The sites most vulnerable to attack on the grid are not nuclear reactorstheir 4-foot-thick concrete containment structures can withstand the impact of a jetliner while sustaining little more than a dent. The real vulnerability, says Mr. Makansi, is the handful of substations around the country where the Northeast, Westem, Canadian and Texas grids interlink. These isolated facilities, whose locations remain undisclosed for obvious reasons, are protected, by little more than barbed wire. Taking them out-which might be done with a few wellplaced bombs-could shut down the entire country.

Mr. Makansi identifies the aging and neglected long-distance transmission lines as the grid's Achilles' heel. Much of the juryrigged system has not been upgraded since the black-and-white television era. Yet Mr. Makansi doesn't quite diagnose the problem correctly. Like many engineers, he is nostalgic for the days of regulated monopoly, when the utilities built what the state approved at a guaranteed profit. The 1990s deregulation, he charges, is at fault. But it is precisely because transmission lines are still not privatized-serving instead as "common carriers"-that this tragedy of the commons is occurring. But on other subjects Mr. Makansi is insightful. He tells of "thermotunnelling," which one day may turn the waste heat of power plants into electricityalthough not in the near future. He demonstrates why backyard windmills and home fuel cells will not render utilities obsolete. "The vast majority of customers don't want to bother with windmills al1d other forms of distributed power," he writes. "They want electricity they don't have to think about."

Mr. Makansi also has a straightforward proposal for reducing carbon emissions. Right now, 50% of U.S. electricity comes from burning coal, 20% from nuclear power. Flipping those numbers would dramatically reduce carbon output and ought to delight global-warming alarmists. The only problem, Mr. Makansi says, "is that many of the same social and political leaders who love the idea of solving global warming now happen to hate the only viable, immediate, and ready-to-roll solution available-nuclear power."

The conflict between Edison's DC and Tesla's AC was eventually resolved by letting the best technology win. Politics did not prevail. These books help to show that, if politics is allowed to determine the outcome of today's electrical debates, we may all be left short-circuited.

Mr. Tucker's "Terrestrial Energy: Rethinking Nuclear Power in the Era of Global Warming" will be published next year by Farrar, Straus & Giroux



GoTo Comprehensive List of Posts in this Blog (Ir a Lista Completa de Todos los Comentarios del Blog)
GoTo Last Comment in Main Page (Ir al Último Comentario en la Página Principal del Blog)



A lo largo de este año han aparecido dos libros sobre el Sector Eléctrico que están siendo muy comentados en Estados Unidos hasta el extremo de que han merecido el artículo del Wall Street Journal cuya traducción es la que sigue:


Tormenta Eléctrica
Por William Tucker
The Wall Street Journal - EUROPE
Tuesday, July 24, 2007

Con el achicharrante calor del verano abrasando en muchas partes de Estados Unidos y millones de acondicionadores de aire funcionando a tope, el país tiene su flirteo anual con un apagón masivo. No obstante, incluso sin que se produzca un accidente dramático, la electricidad está en el centro de cada discusión sobre los impuestos sobre las emisiones de carbono, la energía renovable o el interés de los productores de energía en la construcción de reactores nucleares. Hay mucho en juego.


The Grid


Como escribe Phillip Schewe en "The Grid," La infraestructura eléctrica de los Estados Unidos es "la máquina más compleja jamás creada" ("the most complex machine ever made.") Reuniendo presas hidroeléctricas y centrales de carbón de 1.000 MW, entrelazándolas a través de millares de kilómetros de líneas de transporte, llevando la electricidad a centenares de millares de voltios a través de subestaciones que elevan y reducen esta tensión hasta que finalmente alcanza la última milla para alimentar las casas de los americanos a una tensión doméstica de 120 voltios - la red eléctrica constituye una acción de equilibrio asombroso que debe casar la oferta y la demanda segundo tras segundo, minuto tras minuto, hora tras hora, año tras año.

Como
Jason Makansi, autor de "Lights Out," dice: "Muy poca gente en este planeta aprecia verdaderamente lo difícil que es controlar el fluido eléctrico" ("Very few peopIe on this planet truly appreciate how difficult it is to control the flow of electricity."


Ligths Out


Por supuesto, no siempre funciona. Cuando un par de árboles rozan el conductor de una linea de transporte en Ohio, por ejemplo, la mayor parte de la Costa Este se puede quedar a oscuras como sucedió en agosto de 2003. Los expertos están de acuerdo en que la red de trasnporte a grandes distancias se ha tensionado hasta alcanzar el punto de ruptura. Makansi pregunta: "¿Cómo ha podido acabar un país del Primer Mundo con una red del terecer Mundo?" Schewe, doctor en física de las partículas y redactor jefe del Instituto Americano de Física parece el hombre ideal para abordar este asunto dándonos una vívida historia de la red eléctrica. Schewe recuerda la invención por Nikola Tesla de la corriente de alterna que facilitó el transporte de electricidad más eficientemente y sobre distancias más largas que la corriente continua que defendía Edison. (Tesla y Edison llegaron a ser adversarios amargos sobre este asunto).

El libro "The Grid" es esclarecedor, pero en algun punto de su razonamiento Schewe cautivado por la literatura duda del progreso. Henry David Thoreau, Henry Adán y Lewis Mumford son sus mentores. Cada uno de ellos es citado quejándose de los efectos corruptores de la velocidad y la tecnología y lamenándose de la falta de relaciones más sencillas entre el hombre y la naturaleza. Schewe pregunta: "¿Mereció todo la pena?" ("Is it all worth it?") Como resume: "La red nos ilumina, conserva los alimentos, hace el aluminio más barato. La red también supone contaminación, conductores aéreos, una contribución masiva al calentamiento global". ("The grid...lights our homes, preserves food, brings us cheap aluminum. It also brings us pollution, overhead wires, clockwork tedium, and a massive contribution toward greenhouse warming and climate change.") Al final, Schewe nunca resuelve realmente el asunto. Makansi, consultor del sector eléctrico y fundador de un boletín titulado "Sentido Común Sobre la Energía y Nuestro Medio Ambiente" (Common Sense on Energy and Our Environment), es un ingeniero químico por formación. Hasta cierto punto admite que nunca ha comprendido realmente la diferencia entre corriente alterna y corriente continua. Pero sabe de las idas y venidas del sector. Prueba con esto. Los lugares más vulnerables para atacar la red no son los reactores nucleares dotados con estructuras de contención de 4 pies de hormigón de grueso que pueden resistir el impacto de un avión comercial. La vulnerabilidad real, dice Makansi, es el puñado de subestaciones por todo el país donde interconectan las redes del Northeast, del Westem, el Canadá y Tejas. Estas instalaciones aisladas, cuyos emplazamientos no se desvelan por razones obvias están protegidas por poco más que un alambre con púas.

Makansi señala como talón de Aquiles de la red su extensión y el avejentamiento. Gran parte del sistema erigido no se ha mejorado desde la época de la televisión en blanco y negro. Makansi no diagnostica el problema correctamente del todo. Como muchos ingenieros tiene morriña de los tiempos del monopolio regulado, cuando las compañías eléctricas construían con un beneficio garantizado lo que el estado aprobaba. La desregulación de los años 90 se equivoca, achaca Makansi. Pero es precisamente porque las líneas de transporte no han sido aún privatizadas - sirviendo en su lugar como "comm-carriers"- por lo que está ocurriendo esta tragedia de los bienes comunales. Empero sobre otros temas Makansi es perspicaz. Habla del "thermotunnelling," que un día podrá convertir el calor residual de las centrales eléctricas en electricidad, aunque no en un futuro próximo. Makansi demuestra porque los aerogeneradores y pilas de combustible domésticas no van a convertir en obsoletas a las compañías eléctricas. "La gran mayoria de los clientes no quieren molestias con aerogeneradores y otras formas de potencia distribuída" escribe. "Quieren electricidad y no tener que pensar en ella" ( "The vast majority of customers don't want to bother with windmills al1d other forms of distributed power," he writes. "They want electricity they don't have to think about." )

Makansi tiene también una propuesta directa para reducir las emisiones de carbono. En estos momentos el 50% de la electricidad de los Estados Unidos se produce con térmicas de carbón, el 20% es de producción nuclear. El intercambio de estas cifras reduciría drásticamente las emisiones y debería deleitar a los alarmistas del calentamiento global. El único problema, dice Makansi, "es que muchos de los mismos líderes políticos y sociales que adoran la idea de resolver el calentamiento global que ahora ocurre odian la energía nuclear, única solución viable, inmediata y lista", ("is that many of the same social and political leaders who love the idea of solving global warming now happen to hate the only viable, immediate, and ready-to-roll solution available-nuclear power.")

El conflicto entre la corriente continua de Edison y la corriente alterna de Tesla se resolvió permitiendo que ganara la mejor tecnología. La política no prevaleció. Estos libros ayudan a demostar que, si a la politica se le permite determinar el resultado de los debates eléctricos de hoy, todos nosotros podemos quedar cortocircuitados.

El libro de Tucker "Terrestrial Energy: Rethinking Nuclear Power in the Era of Global Warming" lo publicará el año que viene Farrar, Straus & Giroux


GoTo Comprehensive List of Posts in this Blog (Ir a Lista Completa de Todos los Comentarios del Blog)
GoTo Last Comment in Main Page (Ir al Último Comentario en la Página Principal del Blog)

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

<< Home